CULTURAL SIGHTSEEING


CULTURAL SIGHTSEEING

SAFARI ITS NOT ONLY ABOUT ANIMALS ADD STONNING SCENERY ACTIVITIES FEEL THE DAILY LIFE OF TANZANIA

Cultural Encounters visits homes, schools', farms and places off the beaten track. Hadzabe Lake Eyasi bordering the south-western fringe of the NCA, the salty, sometimes dry, Lake Eyasi is rimmed by the steep wall of the ancient Eyasi Rift. Hunters gatherers go hunting with the boys as the head off with their bows and arrows at down after warming up from a cool night by a fire.

DATOGA



see these ingenious metal workers turning waste metal clients into Speers, arrows-heads tools.

WARUSHA, MERU, AND WACHAGGA



visit the daily working farms help prepare local works and try their local alcoholic brews.

IRANGI & BARBAIG



visit the Kolo Cave paintings and take a canoe safari on lake Babati before heading to Mt. Hanang- Tanzania's 3rd highest peak.

TRIBAL MARRIAGE CEREMONY



receives your marriage blessing messed in the culture of the Maasai or Iragwa people.

4 X 4 TRAL BIKE HIRE



available in Karatu also with pedal cycles.

COFFEE FARM TOUR & ROASING



Pick, see the beans prepared and then roast and taste the delicious drink on the farm.

LOCAL MARKETS & ANIMAL AUCTION WITH LOCAL FOOD



locate a local weekly market where the riot of local colors warm by the ladies trading hand made and fresh goods mix with the activities of the men buying and selling and Eat local BBQ meals and drink the local beers.

BAGAMOYO



Due to its strategic location Bagamoyo become a staging point during the ivory and slave trading area. It is the eighth World Heritage site of Tanzania. The name Bagamoyo is said to be derived from the cry of slaves brought here after the long march from the hinterland to await auction and export, and means "Bwaga Moyo – here I lay down my heart". The somber history of this once-great city is evidenced by remnants of the slave trade -shackle rings set in stone pits in which slaves were kept.

IRAQW TRIBAL DEFENDED HOME -KARATU



The Iraqw have traditionally been viewed as remnants of a Neolithic Afro-Asiatic peoples who practiced plant and animal husbandry in the Great Lakes region — a succession of societies collectively known as the Stone Bowl cultural complex. Most of these early northern migrants are believed to have been absorbed by later movements of Nilotic and Bantu peoples.

Additionally, the Iraqw's ancestors are often credited with having constructed the sprawling Engaruka complex in northern Tanzania. The modern Iraqw practice an intensive form of self-contained agriculture that bears a remarkable similarity to the ruins of stone-walled canals, dams, and furrows that are found at Engaruka. It is possible to visit a traditional defended Iraqw home and take part in the spear throwing and traditions which make these people survivors through the years of time.

KOLO ROCK PAINTINGS



At Kolo, 100km south of Babati, you will find the extensive Kolo rock Paintings, whose origin is the source of intense academic dispute. The paintings themselves show generally simplified figures engaged in hunting or playing musical instruments, or crossing rivers, or animals such as elephants, giraffes, and antelope. Other show unintelligible forms, perhaps early attempts at abstract art. Little is known about the painters, though theories abound. Kolo Rock paintings are set within hilly landscape characterized by miombo woodlands that were home to herds of wildlife roaming peacefully within the Rift Valley.

MAASAI CULTURAL BOMA – NGORONGORO



They are among the best known local populations due to their residence near the many game parks of the African Great Lakes, and their distinctive customs and dress. The Maasai speak the Maa language, a member of the Nilo-Saharan family that is related to Dinka, Kalenjin and Nuer languages. Some have become educated in the official languages of Tanzania, Swahili, and English. The Tanzanian government has instituted programs to encourage the Maasai to abandon their traditional semi-nomadic lifestyle, but the people have continued their age-old customs. It has been suggested that the Maasai could pass on traditional survival skills such as the ability to produce food in deserts and scrublands that could help populations adapt to climate change. Many Maasai tribes throughout Tanzania welcome visits to their villages to experience their culture, traditions, and lifestyle. It is possible to take part in their pastoral way of life and stay overnight in their traditional defended Boma.